Stark Minority Business teaches entrepreneurship to Crenshaw students

Linda D. Garrow

CANTON – A dozen Crenshaw Middle School eighth grade students are getting lessons in entrepreneurship.

The students are participating in the Youth Entrepreneur Program developed by the Stark County Minority Business Association.

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During the five-week program program, students will break into four groups of three, take on a business idea and develop a plan for a company. Later they will pitch their idea to area business leaders, similar to a “Shark Tank” presentation.

Elizabeth Collier, an eighth grader at Crenshaw Middle School, receives a Google Chromebook as a participant in the Youth Entrepreneurship Program being developed by the Stark County Minority Business Association. A grant from the city and support from Charter Communications are making the program possible.

Details of Stark’s Youth Entrepreneurship Program 

The program’s goal is to get students excited about the prospect of starting a business, said Leonard Stevens, chief executive officer of the Minority Business Association.

As the second session started on Tuesday, the students received tools — Google Chromebooks and a backpack — to help them in the program. The laptops are courtesy Spectrum and Charter Communications, a partner in the program.

Students also heard words of encouragement from state Rep. Thomas West, D-Canton, and received some coaching from Nate Chester III, a barber and owner of Chester’s MopShop.

“I’m hoping, and I’m banking that you’ll be the next generation of entrepreneurs here in Stark County,” West said.

State Rep. Thomas West, D-Canton, speaks with Crenshaw Middle School students, including Aniya Bailey-Gooden (left) and Reygan Padgett, during a session of the Youth Entrepreneurship Program being developed by the Stark County Minority Business Association. A grant from the city and support from Charter Communications are making the program possible.

Crenshaw students embrace the Stark County Minority Business Association effort

This is the first year for the Youth Entrepreneur Program, but Stevens wants to see it expanded next year. He hopes that teaching students about entrepreneurship might show them alternatives to college.  

The Crenshaw students applied for the program after hearing a presentation from the Stark County Minority Business Association. Applicants were reviewed by a selection committee.

https://www.cantonrep.com/story/news/local/2022/04/16/stark-minority-business-teaches-entrepreneurship-crenshaw-students/9463700002/

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